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COSD Longines Paratrooper WW2 Military Watch

Longines COSD Watch

This watch was designed to be used by British paratooper formations during the later part of WW2.

The actual movement is not shockproofed, and therefore relied upon the large “waterproof”

The case  had a much larger diameter than the movement to absorb shocks.

The case is large even by the military watch size standards of today, with the early dials & hands being highly radioactive.

This watch was not widely issued during WW2, and were apparently not ready in time in large numbers for the invasion of Europe in 1944 or the famous Arnhem parachute operation.

After WW2 a number of these watches were given new dials and cases.

RAF 6B SMITHS MILITARY WATCH

A great deal has been written about the W10 Smiths Military watch issued to the British MOD.

However I have just purchased a Smiths Military Watch that was issued to the RAF in 1968, and to all intents and purposes is identical to the watch issues to the Army.

The design of the military watch incorporates a dial that is matte black, with white Arabic numerals and luminous indices and hands. It also has a center second sweep hand with corresponding  hack function that  allows the hand to be temporally stopped when the crown is pulled.

The case is 36mm diameter not including the crown, and is just over 11mm thick including the acrylic crystal.

Smiths won a contract to supply the British Military with a General Service watch from 1967 to 1970 and were  manufactured in Bishop’s Cleeve, to the then latest MOD specifications.

The movement although well specified for the time and apparently took details from higher grade Swiss manufactured watches, did have  issues with setting levers and centre second pinions.

However more importantly from a historical point of view, it was the last British issued watch built using an all British movement.

Smiths 6B RAF issue Military Watch

Smiths 6B RAF issue Military Watch

Military Watch/Clock Information

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How Military Watch Buyer Buys Your Military Watches For Sale

Are you looking to sell your Military Wristwatch/Watch/Timepiece? We buy Military Watches from all periods and specialize in World War II items.  We can buy your Vintage Military Timepieces including Chronographs, Aircraft and Naval clocks, as we are always looking for this type of  militaria. If you have a military souvenir watch, please contact me today.

 I look forward to helping you with all your militaria selling item needs.

Selling your Airforce/Luftwaffe/RAF watch or clock is quite easy. Simply  send us a message through the site with what items you are looking to sell.  I will contact you to go over your items and answer any questions you may have. We look forward to helping you obtain top dollar for all the items you are selling.

BROADARROW

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British Army W.W.W Watches

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WW2 German Airforce (Luftwaffe) Vintage Military Observer Watches

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Luftwaffe Vintage Military Chronograph Wristwatches

During WW2 the Luftwaffe pilots were flying some of the most advanced aircraft of the time. They were also equipped with very high quality wrist watches that were able to help them for navigation purposes as a backup system to the Junghans and Kienzle cockpit clocks. Read the rest of this entry »

List of Vintage Miltary Watch Manufacturers

This is a list of Military Watch manufacturers that I have compiled when collecting vintage military watches over the years as an avid collector
If you have a high quality item for sale please don’t hesitate to contact me as I always pay top price for quality.

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Finding a Military Wristwatch, Timepiece or Clock

post-ww2-omega-53-raf-watch

The most important consideration for a collector to see on a military watch is condition. However this does not mean that an item has to be highly cleaned and polished to achieve the greatest resale price. In fact if an item is just dirty and age patina has occurred, it is best just to leave everything in place, when the item is introduced to a buyer. Collectors prefer a military watch or military clock to retain the original finish, rather than the case becoming highly polished.

I have seen a number of military watches, and other military timepieces being spoilt by Read the rest of this entry »